•  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Print Recipe
Devonshire Clotted Cream Recipe
Devonshire clotted cream is no longer cream, but not yet butter. Tender, creamy-sweet, and amazingly delicious. In Devonshire, farmers have been preparing them using ancient technology for many many years. The secret of production, as usual, is different for everyone and is not particularly disclosed. But here I met a recipe on the Internet how to cook melted cream at home, in the oven. In Devonshire, this clotted cream is a mandatory part of afternoon tea. They are served with skins. The scones are cut lengthwise, spread with strawberry jam, and put a spoonful of melted cream on top. It's divinely delicious!
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Devonshire clotted cream:
  • 1 liter Cream exclusively homemade at least 40%
For serve:
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Devonshire clotted cream:
  • 1 liter Cream exclusively homemade at least 40%
For serve:
Instructions
  1. So, anticipating the questions, I will answer right away - no, it can not be prepared from ultra-pasteurized industrial cream for whipping 33-35%. I tried it and it didn't work out.Cream is needed exactly at HOME. Fat content of at least 40% and preferably not thickened, that is, fresh. I bought from a private seller, from whom I take village milk.Pour the cream into a baking dish with a layer of about 4-5 cm. And put it in the oven at a temperature of 80-85°C for 10-12 hours. EVERYTHING. Do not touch, do not interfere, do not shake the cream, let it languish quietly without your participation. And also, do not raise the temperature, trying to speed up the process. The cream should not boil. Step away from the oven and calmly go about your business. The cream will not run away, it will not burn, do not be afraid.
    So, anticipating the questions, I will answer right away - no, it can not be prepared from ultra-pasteurized industrial cream for whipping 33-35%. I tried it and it didn't work out.Cream is needed exactly at HOME. Fat content of at least 40% and preferably not thickened, that is, fresh. I bought from a private seller, from whom I take village milk.Pour the cream into a baking dish with a layer of about 4-5 cm. And put it in the oven at a temperature of 80-85°C for 10-12 hours. EVERYTHING. Do not touch, do not interfere, do not shake the cream, let it languish quietly without your participation.
And also, do not raise the temperature, trying to speed up the process. The cream should not boil. Step away from the oven and calmly go about your business. The cream will not run away, it will not burn, do not be afraid.
  2. In the process of languishing, the cream is divided into three layers: the top layer is a crust (foam) of a slightly yellowish color, with oil droplets released.The middle layer is the melted cream itself, with a fat content of about 55-60%And the bottom layer is buttermilk or skimmed cream.
    In the process of languishing, the cream is divided into three layers: the
top layer is a crust (foam) of a slightly yellowish color, with oil droplets released.The middle layer is the melted cream itself, with a fat content of about 55-60%And the bottom layer is buttermilk or skimmed cream.
  3. Carefully remove the mold from the oven, taking care not to shake it. Allow to cool to room temperature. Cover with plastic wrap, so that the film does not come into contact with the cream. and put it in the refrigerator for 8-10 hours. During this time, the two upper layers are compacted.Carefully remove the top two layers with a slotted spatula or a slotted spoon or spoon. You will see that there is a little liquid at the bottom, drain it carefully and use it instead of milk in any recipes.And here are the top two layers: crust+cream - this is exactly what we need! Put it in a jar and enjoy.
    Carefully remove the mold from the oven, taking care not to shake it. Allow to cool to room temperature. Cover with plastic wrap, so that the film does not come into contact with the cream. and put it in the refrigerator for 8-10 hours. During this time, the two upper layers are compacted.Carefully remove the top two layers with a slotted spatula or a slotted spoon or spoon. You will see that there is a little liquid at the bottom, drain it carefully and use it instead of milk in any recipes.And here are the top two layers: crust+cream - this is exactly what we need! Put it in a jar and enjoy.
  4. In some recipes, it is recommended to beat the cream slightly, in other recipes (more traditional) they say that real Devonshire clotted cream should be heterogeneous, with layers of crust-foam. I lightly whipped it up. Next time I will do it using traditional technology.Devonshire is a wonderful place, one of the most picturesque corners of Britain. So, the tables are covered with snow-white tablecloths, cups of the finest porcelain are arranged, tea is brewed, sandwiches and cakes are waiting in the wings. This is a ritual called "Devonshire tea". You are sitting waiting at the table and here, they bring you a huge teapot, a milk jug, plump warm scones, strawberry jam and clotted cream. You pour a cup of tea, cut the warm scone in half, spread it with strawberry jam, put a spoonful of melted cream on top... You take a bite of this delicious delicacy and take a sip of fragrant tea... And at this moment you are immersed in the Victorian era... Afternoon tea (afternoon tea) came into fashion in the middle of the 19th century and since then has not lost either love or popularity. Perhaps there is no other European country that so ardently likes to arrange tea parties. In England, tea is more than a drink. This is an important part of life, a special philosophy.
    In some recipes, it is recommended to beat the cream slightly, in other recipes (more traditional) they say that real Devonshire clotted cream should be heterogeneous, with layers of crust-foam.
I lightly whipped it up. Next time I will do it using traditional technology.Devonshire is a wonderful place, one of the most picturesque corners of Britain.
So, the tables are covered with snow-white tablecloths, cups of the finest porcelain are arranged, tea is brewed, sandwiches and cakes are waiting in the wings. This is a ritual called "Devonshire tea". You are sitting waiting at the table and here, they bring you a huge teapot, a milk jug, plump warm scones, strawberry jam and clotted cream. You pour a cup of tea, cut the warm scone in half, spread it with strawberry jam, put a spoonful of melted cream on top... You take a bite of this delicious delicacy and take a sip of fragrant tea... And at this moment you are immersed in the Victorian era...
Afternoon tea (afternoon tea) came into fashion in the middle of the 19th century and since then has not lost either love or popularity. Perhaps there is no other European country that so ardently likes to arrange tea parties. In England, tea is more than a drink. This is an important part of life, a special philosophy.
  5. Did you know that the famous detective writer Agatha Christie was born in Devonshire? She had a weakness for clotted cream. They even say that she always had a cup of cream near the typewriter (and on the cup it was written " Don't be greedy!"). And in her autobiography, she wrote: "I was also very fond of Devonshire cream. How much tastier it is, I told my mother, than fish oil! You could spread them on bread or just eat them with a spoon. Alas! In today's Devon, you can no longer find real Devonshire cream, skimmed from boiled milk and laid in layers with yellow tops in clay crates. Of course, I'm just sure that my favorite dish was, remained and, perhaps, will remain forever cream." "Agatha Christie. Autobiography", 1965
    Did you know that the famous detective writer Agatha Christie was born in Devonshire? She had a weakness for clotted cream. They even say that she always had a cup of cream near the typewriter (and on the cup it was written " Don't be greedy!").
And in her autobiography, she wrote: "I was also very fond of Devonshire cream. How much tastier it is, I told my mother, than fish oil! You could spread them on bread or just eat them with a spoon. Alas! In today's Devon, you can no longer find real Devonshire cream, skimmed from boiled milk and laid in layers with yellow tops in clay crates. Of course, I'm just sure that my favorite dish was, remained and, perhaps, will remain forever cream."
"Agatha Christie. Autobiography", 1965

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of